Duran Henry

Duran Henry is a Tlingit/Southern Tutchone member of the Kwanlin Dun First Nation in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. He is a member of the Crow Clan. He was born in 1983 and is the son of artist Ray Shorty and nephew to artists Richard, Jim and Eddie Shorty.

Duran has enjoyed drawing and painting from a young age. As a teenager, he took part in many art classes and workshops. Joining the Northern Cultural Expressions Society (formally Sundog Carving Studio) in 2006, he learned under the instruction of Tlingit carver Calvin Morberg. He has also studied under Lewis McKenna, William Callaghan, Victor Reese of BC, and totem carver, Sean Hinton of Chilliwack, BC.

Duran participated in Sundog’s Carving Our Path Program in 2006-2007, the Yukon First Nations Arts Festival in Whitehorse, 2008, as well as the Tlingit Gathering in Juneau Alaska, 2008. In more recent years, he has participated in the Dug Out Canoe projects (2016/2017), and the annual Adaka Festival in Whitehorse, YT.

Duran now works primarily with wood, carving paddles, plaques, masks and panels. He currently uses basswood, yellow and red cedar for his creations. He likes to make his own designs using pencil and acrylic paints. He has started making prints, and has some of a bentwood box he designed and created.

Influenced by his father and uncles, Duran is committed to his emerging career as an artist and carver. He is currently in the advanced course and teaching local youths in elementary and high school NCES programs. He enjoys listening to head-banging metal music and realism in other art forms. Duran has overcome many obstacles in life. His art has helped him through life and painful experiences

Incorporating traditional stories into each of his pieces, Duran Henry is continuing to carry on the artistic values and lifestyle of his family.